DELTA 24" Scroll Saw of uncertain vintage


Can't say I'm enthusiastic about that color.


The motor was green, too, when I acquired it. The original color was a generic electric motor black. I repainted it in RustOleum - Gloss Black and Regal Red. The label on the can of Regal Red would lead one to believe it to be a more sedate color, so beware.


The nameplate was in nice shape, and not green, although I did have to scrape off some stray greenie bits.

Repulsion Induction motors are nowadays obsolete, but of course they still work. This commutator doesn't connect directly to the supply voltage, it just connects to itself, basically. It makes for a motor which is just too weird to throw out, so even though the shaft is slightly bent I plan to keep it.


The motor was held together by four of these rods ....


.... with two threaded standoffs for the belt guard at one end, and two strange nuts. The other end was originally held on with four of the strange nuts.


One of the strange nuts was missing, and not easily replaced, so I made four slightly longer rods to hold the motor together, and put acorn nuts on one end.


The switch needs a bit of sprucing-up. I have no idea if that's the one Delta sold with the saw, or what. The switch is listed as an option in Delta catalogs of the late 1940s and 1950s.


The belt guard is an elaborate 2-piece affair ....




.... of cast aluminum.

The lamp was optional.


There was once a decal down here, undoubted with some sort of dire warning. It was painted over and is probably not salvageable. I suppose I should count myself fortunate that the plate showing the table inclination wasn't painted over too. Here is what the decal looked like.


The mainshaft shows signs of an adventurous life -


There are no serial number plates anywhere on this saw, and no holes indicating that any are missing. The stand has a plate apparently put there by a retailer -


It reads -
SOLD BY
GEORGE T. REYNOLDS & SON,
INC.
NEW AND USED
MACHINERY
PROVIDENCE, R.I.


It may not have moved far since it was sold by Mr. Reynolds, as it was still in Rhode Island when I bought it. It's in Massachusetts now.





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Updated: December 1, 2004